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Balmy Days in Blissful Bulgaria

Views on BG | February 27, 2012, Monday // 08:02| Views: 1980 | Comments: 7
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Bulgaria: Balmy Days in Blissful Bulgaria An Eastern delight: Bulgaria's Black sea coast is home to pretty resorts such as Nessebar. Photo by the Daily Mail

By Dymphna Byrne

The Daily Mail

"Why go there?" was the usual reaction when we revealed we were off to the Black Sea for a June break. It was usually followed by something along the lines of: "The Mediterranean's nearer and better, Bulgaria's coast is spoilt and overcrowded." But so are swathes of the Mediterranean coast.

In fact, the Black Sea offers pretty much everything the Med does: reliable sunshine May to September, safe bathing, good beaches and a mixture of quiet retreats and teeming resorts.

We stayed at Saints Constantine and Helena, Bulgaria's oldest resort, a collection of holiday houses, private villas and hotels scattered through a mature park of magnificent tall trees - oak, beech, fig, poplar and cypress.

When the hot summer sun beats down, the ten-minute stroll to the beach through the cool, dappled shade of these trees is a pleasure rather than a penance. Saplings, tagged with the donor's name and planted in the odd bare patch, commemorate the park's centenary in 2008.

Quite a stretch of the immediate shore has been cordoned off by large hotels with private beaches. Primed by old hands at our more modest hotel, we made for one of the unspoilt rocky coves further along the coast.

In we waded; it was like Cornwall but much warmer - in fact, blissfully warm.

Further along again, people swam sedately in a mineral-water pool. 'Taking the waters' is popular in Bulgaria, with many hotels having both mineral and swimming pools.

Later that day - showered, dressed and respectable - we made for the cool, airy bar of the large Grand Varna hotel. We were refused a drink; we had no tag, we were not residents.

Neither could we book a table for dinner. The hotel's 'all-inclusive' deal which bars outsiders must also stop residents trying the small, cheerful owner-run restaurants, coffee shops and bars that, along with a colorful medley of stalls selling fruit, toys, clothes, paintings and postcards, line the glades and leafy lanes that wind through the trees to the sea.

We chickened out of the six-mile walk along the tree-backed beach to the old port of Varna. Instead, we bought a 24-hour ticket - using half one day, half the next - on the red double-decker Varna City Tour bus, a hop-on hop-off service that conveniently takes you into town from St Constantine.

Passing up the zoo, the aquarium, the dolphinarium and the Oriental market, we made for the city centre. The domes of the Orthodox cathedral gleaming in the sun, the dark red opera house and the sparkling fountain in the main square, the cafes, the book and bric-a-brac stalls under the trees - it made an exotic and appealing picture.

And Bulgaria can be exotic. In spite of the reminders of the crushing Soviet rule seen in the few abandoned, brutal buildings interspersed between Varna's beautiful, often crumbling 19th Century houses, there is the occasional whisper of the unknown East.

You catch it too, in spite of the crowds, in the faded frescoes of the old Byzantine churches in Nesebar, a Unesco World Heritage Site close to Sunny Beach, the biggest resort on the coast.

For centuries conquerors and migrants - Greeks, Persians, Romans and Slavs - swept across Bulgaria, leaving behind churches, monasteries, mosques and well-preserved old villages.

Yet this country, rich in history and natural beauty and bordered by Romania, Serbia, Macedonia, Greece and Turkey, is now best known for its sixth border - the Black Sea - a 235-mile stretch of sandy, safe beaches, coves, cliffs, a dozen or so resorts and Varna, queen of the Black Sea coast.

Although Varna is a thriving commercial and maritime centre, the beach is only a ten-minute walk from the traffic-free and attractive main square, alive with cafes and restaurants, walkers and talkers.

Simply take the wide, pedestrianised Boulevard Knjaz Boris I, past modern shops and tall old houses. Cross Primorski Park where old women, crocheting under shady trees, smile at but do not bother passers-by, and voila! There, stretching to St Constantine, lies the calm blue sea and the golden sand.

We had lunch at a seafacing beach restaurant - a classic Bulgarian salad of locally grown peppers, tomatoes, cucumber and grated cheese with garlic bread and a glass of wine, all for about ?6. You'll struggle to beat the price or the atmosphere in the Med.

One of Bulgaria's greatest treasures, a superb collection of gold jewellery, much of it over 6,000 years old and discovered in 1972, is in Varna's Archaeological Museum, an austere 19th Century building that used to be a girls' school. Don't miss it.

Star turn is a pair of intricately worked pendant earrings of Nike, Greek goddess of victory, while a beautifully wrought, heavy gold bracelet inlaid with precious stones is the kind of gift Richard Burton would have presented to Elizabeth Taylor.

We never made it to Balchik, a traditional seaside town clinging to the cliffs further along the coast, nor inland to Veliko Turnovo, the striking rocky fortress and 12th Century capital, but we saw enough to realise that this country with a complicated past is more than just a playground for sun-starved northerners.

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» To the forumComments (7)
#7
Naso - 27 Feb 2012 // 15:49:40

Having a bit of fun for leisure chat is ok, but getting serious is a different thing.
I love the “Love Bulgaria” 1%++ spontaneous impulse, the concept is very powerful to be ignored. Well, it is possible some kind of Social-PR-Network futures to be embedded to the media site. Hmmm.... I am getting curious to see what Max M3 will perceive about that.

#6
Harley - 27 Feb 2012 // 11:36:42

Naso, let's start with the staff and then gradually move on to the site. This campaign will take time, so let's start one step at a time.

#5
Naso - 27 Feb 2012 // 11:26:15

Harley,

Are you inviting Novinite to join the the “Love Bulgaria” club? Or just the staff.

#4
Harley - 27 Feb 2012 // 10:26:15

This is a great example of how the foreign press comes and really loves and appreciates the beauty of Bulgaria.

Unfortunately in Novinite we never have the pleasure of such articles written by their own staff. Every time I read an article about golf, wine, the wonderful towns of Bulgaria's Black Sea coast and about cultural tourism it's always an article written by a non-Bulgarian media outlet.

Let's promote Bulgaria on this website!

Love Bulgaria!

#3
hercules - 27 Feb 2012 // 10:15:23

Andy,

The second person in the Harley, Seedy, and Beatit trilogy has appeared and it seems does not agree with your postings….


Thank you Harley,

It is time The “Hate Bulgaria” Terror, to be addressed openly and publicly in Bulgaria and Europe. As well understood that the “Hate Terror” is not just matter of Bulgarian security critical issue, but it is intangibly destroying European Union stability.

Hercules, is just one more case how The “Hate Bulgaria” Terror, is rooting in Bulgaria, and stabilising the unity of the EU.

The “Love Bulgaria” and “Love European Union” process is just starting.

The “Hate Terror” is simply a Terror and should and must be handled as Terror; in the local and global European level.

When you sleep with dogs, you get fleas !!

#2
Seedy - 27 Feb 2012 // 09:50:36

And your often-incomprehensible posts, my friend, remind us that things in Bulgaria can be not only "balmy" but also "barmy"..... ;)

#1
Naso - 27 Feb 2012 // 09:01:47

Horse Riding Tours across Bulgaria and the hidden eco-trails in Rhodope mountains the land of Orpheus, is really unique travel holiday experience in Bulgarian.

“Love Bulgaria” 1%++

Bulgaria news Novinite.com (Sofia News Agency - www.sofianewsagency.com) is unique with being a real time news provider in English that informs its readers about the latest Bulgarian news. The editorial staff also publishes a daily online newspaper "Sofia Morning News." Novinite.com (Sofia News Agency - www.sofianewsagency.com) and Sofia Morning News publish the latest economic, political and cultural news that take place in Bulgaria. Foreign media analysis on Bulgaria and World News in Brief are also part of the web site and the online newspaper. News Bulgaria